Archive for the 'Donald Trump' Category

Praying for the Other Side

Please don’t click away without reading and praying this prayer. While it’s titled “…for Mr. Trump”, I believe it speaks to all of us caught up in this bitterly contentious election. If your political perspective doesn’t match the author’s, pray for the politician on the opposite side of the spectrum–you know, the one who makes your blood boil! Feel free to lovingly adjust some of the specifics accordingly.  This prayer reminds us that even those on “the other side” are human beings created in God’s image, just like ourselves. We can’t self-righteously “aim” this prayer at “them” when it’s equally about “us”: “Let all of us see the same suffering Jesus” and “God who set aside all comfort”. It invites all of us equally to repent of giving in to the temptation to “look strong” and “mask our weakness”. It points toward deep, authentic unity as we pray beyond all that divides us,

“We need to make ourselves less again,
So that you can be Great.”

A Lenten Prayer for Mr. Trump

[Reposted with the author’s permission]

Father,
We’ve been astounded, frustrated, angry, resentful, defensive.
We’re feeling indignant, maligned, misrepresented.
We, as Christians, have reacted to the brand of “Trump.”
We confess it keeps us from praying for the man, Trump.

We bring your son before you, this man who claims your name.
We can’t understand him.
But you know his heart, you know his deepest thoughts.

Father, In his efforts to look strong,
You know where he feels weak.
You know the parts of himself he works to protect.
You know his defense mechanisms.
You are not fooled by them.
You are not limited by them.

Let your Spirit find those places of shame, of pride, of emptiness.
Meet him there with your grace, your kind challenge, your fullness.
Reveal to him the power of asking forgiveness.

When Mr. Trump goes to church this Easter
Let him see the suffering Jesus.
Show him the way Jesus laid aside his rights,
The way he defended the oppressed,
The way he listened, welcomed,
The way True Power was revealed in nakedness,
The way True Fullness came through emptying.
In church, reveal to our brother, not a comfortable institution,
But a God who set aside all comfort.

And when we go to church this Easter,
Let us see the same Jesus.

We confess that the news has shifted our attention.
We confess our hope has not been in your power.
Regardless of how the primaries go,
Who the candidates are,
What happens in November,
Our hope lies in You.
 Use this prayer, birthed from frustration, to change our hearts.

Let us see the ways we are also tempted to look strong.

We repent from our own efforts to mask our weakness.
We repent, as your Church, from our desire to protect an institution.
We don’t need to make America great again.
We need to make ourselves less again.
So that you can be Great.

Amen.

Telling the Truth, Being the Truth

Before the truth can set you freeYou are truly my disciples if you remain faithful to my teaching. Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”–Jesus, John 8:31-32 CEB

I tried to start this piece by being cool, calm, objective, even-handed. That approach generated only multiple “deletes” and an annoyingly blank screen. So I’ll just say it:

Donald Trump’s rise is a nightmare perilously close to coming true. The super-slick salesman, self-proclaimed consummate deal-maker, and reality-TV star has insulted, bullied, and bigoted his way to the inside track for the Republican presidential nomination. He’s skillfully amplified popular frustration, anger, and prejudice to unprecedented intensity. He might actually become the forty-fifth President of the United States!

I’ve watched what I knew could never happen, and increasingly asked God and myself, “How shall we who follow Jesus respond? What’s our place in this struggle?” We could get down in the mud with him the way Mr. Trump’s opponents have following last week’s debate. We could proclaim, “Trump’s not a [real] Christian.” When Pope Francis tried that, folks told him to mind his own business. We could engage in endless nitpicking and Bible-quoting to make our case, at least to ourselves. But we’d likely also confirm in many minds the popular stereotype of Christians as narrow, judgmental, unloving grinches. So let’s not wade into the muddy morass where Mr. Trump and his opponents have chosen to wallow. Let’s not attack or “go negative”. Let’s focus on issues and substance rather than insults and half-truths.

I believe the distinctive contribution followers of Jesus can make is simply  to tell the truth about the transforming impact of faith in Christ. I suggest that our witness [telling the truth we have seen, heard, and experienced] embrace the strategy popularly attributed to St. Francis—“Preach the Gospel at all times; use words when necessary.” [While scholars now doubt that those are Francis’ words, that doesn’t diminish their wisdom. ] Let us simply “tell the truth and be the truth” that is Christ.   

The following biblical passages sketch the shape that message takes in our lives:

  • Jesus describes the upside-down blessedness of living his way: “You’re blessed when you’re at the end of your rope…when you feel you’ve lost what is most dear to you…when you’re content with just who you are…when you’ve worked up a good appetite for God…when you care…when you get your inside world—your mind and heart—put right…when you can show people how to cooperate instead of compete or fight…when your commitment to God provokes persecution” (Matthew 5:1-12 MSG)
  • A scholar asks Jesus which one of the 613 commandments in Hebrew scripture matters most: “Jesus replied, ‘The most important one is Israel, listen! Our God is the one Lord, and you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your being, with all your mind, and with all your strength. The second is this, You will love your neighbor as yourself. No other commandment is greater than these.’” (Mark 12:28-34 CEB))
  • Jesus redefines greatness when his disciples argue among themselves: “Kings like to throw their weight around and people in authority like to give themselves fancy titles. It’s not going to be that way with you. Let the senior among you become like the junior; let the leader act the part of the servant. Who would you rather be: the one who eats the dinner or the one who serves the dinner? You’d rather eat and be served, right? But I’ve taken my place among you as the one who serves.” (Luke 22:24-27 MSG)
  • “…the fruit of the [Holy] Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.” (Galatians 5:22-23 NRSV)
  • Paul tells Christians seeking to be faithful in the midst of a pagan culture: “I’d say you’ll do best by filling your minds and meditating on things true, noble, reputable, authentic, compelling, gracious—the best, not the worst; the beautiful, not the ugly; things to praise, not things to curse”. (Philippians 4:8 MSG)
  • “…religion does make your life rich, by making you content with what you have. We didn’t bring anything into this world, and we won’t take anything with us when we leave. So we should be satisfied just to have food and clothes. People who want to be rich fall into all sorts of temptations and traps. They are caught by foolish and harmful desires that drag them down and destroy them. The love of money causes all kinds of trouble. Some people want money so much that they have given up their faith and caused themselves a lot of pain.” (1 Timothy 6:6-10 CEV)
  • “If anyone boasts, “I love God,” and goes right on hating his brother or sister…he is a liar. If he won’t love the person he can see, how can he love the God he can’t see? The command we have from Christ is blunt: Loving God includes loving people. You’ve got to love both.” (1 John 4:20-21 MSG)
  • Jesus tells a story about the Last Judgment. People are evaluated according to how they’ve treated their neighbors in desperate need—poor, sick, homeless, prisoners, etc. “Whenever you did [or failed to do] one of these things to someone overlooked or ignored, that was me—you did it to me.” (Matthew 25:31-46 MSG)

Wow! Who set the bar so high? Not me. Jesus and his early followers knew that’s how much God loved them and wanted to do in and through them–and every one of his precious children. Our most compelling witness among our neighbors is just being ourselves in Christ–“co-operating, not competing or fighting”; caring for the “overlooked or ignored”; focusing on “the best, not the worst; the beautiful, not the ugly”; cultivating a bumper crop of “…love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control “. The Truth that is Christ sets us free from living life against one another as our hyper-polarized society insists we must. The Truth sets us free to live life with and for others so that all God’s children may know the “abundant life” God wills for all of us.

The truth that is Christ is the ultimate antidote to toxic hate-and fear-based politics. Incarnation continues to be the most effective way to communicate transforming, liberating Truth. The best vehicles available for this mission are–you and me. Our neighbors get the message through the lives we live with them day by day. Let’s try something together. Pick one of the Bible passages above. Try to embody it in your life each day. Be sure to fasten your seat belt. God’s Spirit will grow us into people who tell Truth by being Truth–not perfectly, of course, but far better than we imagined on good days. Our incarnational witness will reach and change more people and   situations than we dare to dream–even in this bizarre and sometimes scary political climate.

Truth will set you free


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