Archive for the 'Jphn Wesley' Category

Transformed NonConformists, the Creative Maladjusted, and the Spirit

For the secomakingdisciplestransformationnd year in a row I’m helping teach our church’s Confirmation class. Confirmation in the United Methodist Church (and some others) invites students in middle-school and above to take a deeper look at Christian faith. Ideally these young men and women will  “confirm” as their own the Christian faith they’ve learned from their families and their church. We’re about a month away from our church’s Confirmation celebration. On that great day, these youth will join twelve million other United Methodists in our mission “… to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. “ (2012 United Methodist Book of Discipline, Par. 120). They’ll share our mutual promise to support this mission with our “prayers, presence, gifts, service, and witness”. While this generation’s discipleship will reflect their God-given uniqueness and the times in which they live, they’ll also show a strong “family resemblance” to previous generations of the Christian community.

The world in which we live and serve as “disciples of Jesus Christ” hasn’t stood still during our four-month journey. It’s continued to change at a pace somewhere between breathless and chaotic. Much of that change runs counter to our vision of “the transformation of the world”. I wonder how well we’ve equipped our students for their/our transforming mission. Doing church “the way we’ve always done it” won’t work any better than it has for the last few decades. Our class is learning the Church’s traditions. One we often fail to teach is that God is “making all things new” (Revelation 21:5) and invites us to partner in that continuing process of God’s Spirit uses God’s people to tell the Christian story in new ways that touch peoples’ hearts and “make new” our ever-changing world.

Jim Wallis wrote recently about an inter-racial, ecumenical gathering on the 48th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination (April 5, 1968) at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Ebenezer is the church both Dr. King and his father served for many years. Wallis’ closing remarks that evening included some of Dr. King’s own words: “This hour in history needs a dedicated circle of transformed nonconformists … The saving of our world from pending doom will come, not through the complacent adjustment of the conforming majority, but through the creative maladjustment of a nonconforming minority… Human salvation lies in the hands of the creative maladjusted.” (Strength to Love)Transformed NonconformistDr. King described the post-Easter church perfectly! Jesus’ first followers formed a community of radical sharing. They welcomed the poor, the crippled, everyone their Jewish religious leaders had labeled “unclean”. Then Peter and Paul threw open the doors of the church to Gentiles—the most unclean of all! And that was just the beginning. These “transformed nonconformists” were out to change everything!  I would argue that the Spirit moves more often through out-liers than through the Establishment:

  • In 5th-Century Ireland pirates captured a Christian named Patrick. This “nonconforming minority” of one got to know his captors so well that he translated the story of Jesus into their own cultural expressions and eventually baptized many of them.
  • In Germany in 1517 a “creatively maladjusted” young monk challenged the massive Christian monopoly known as the Roman Catholic Church. Martin Luther’s boldness ignited a revolutionary transformation in the Church of Jesus Christ.
  • In early 18th-century England two seminarians invited fellow students to form an intentional community. These “Methodists”, as their critics called them, set out to live a more disciplined Christian life together. They embraced their new name. John Wesley wrote the words for the new movement, and his brother Charles wrote the music. John struggled for a while, but eventually experienced a personal transformation that focused and energized his ministry. The “nonconforming minority” called Methodists grew into today’s global Methodist movement that is millions strong.

The history of the Church is full of “nonconforming minorities” and “creatively maladjusted” communities like the Desert Fathers, the Mennonites, Clarence Jordan and Koinonia Farm, Howard Thurman and the Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples, Henri Nouwen and L’Arche Daybreak, Sojourners Community, Cecil Williams and Glide Memorial Church. Beyond these headliners, millions of very ordinary followers of Jesus share God’s transforming love in Christ each day in countless ways all over our planet.

Last fall I wrote about “Doing Jesus’ Laundry”.  Fifteen-year-old Caroline Gowan needed a community service project to complete requirements for a Girl Scout award. Caroline and her mother regularly made their own laundry detergent, and donated some to their church’s food  pantry. Clients welcomed it because it saved them some money, but they still spent up to $20-30 every time they went to a laundromat. Caroline thought, prayed, studied—and formed a plan. She arranged to use a local laundromat one afternoon a month. She enlisted her church’s help with donations of money, supplies, and volunteers. She spread the word as widely as she knew how. Last June “Loads of Love” began washing clothes and sharing God’s love in Bonaire, GA. They come in with dirty laundry,” Caroline says, “and leave with a renewed spirit and clean clothes…I feel like not only am I doing something for the people around me and that I am doing something for people I don’t even know, but that I’m doing something for the Lord. I am doing Jesus’ laundry!”

A few daysJesus Laundry ago I heard from Caroline’s mother! She’d seen my post. Caroline had received her Girl Scout Gold Award. “Loads of Love” continues “doing Jesus’ laundry” in Bonaire, GA and many other communities. Last Friday,” Michelle said, “27 volunteers from her family joined [Caroline] to serve the people in this community in honor of our grandmother and her legacy of service. Cousins came from all over the state and we had a family reunion at the laundromat. We began the night with $250 in quarters and when we left, we had done dozens of loads and had $315 in the box. There is no way to explain it other than ‘loaves and fishes math’. One thing she knows; God wants her to continue this ministry”. 

Thank God for “transformed nonconformists” like Paul, Peter, Patrick, Caroline Gowan, and all the rest! Thousands of youth are in Confirmation classes like ours this Spring. May the Spirit form them into “transformed nonconformists” serving our God who “makes all things new”!

John Wesley on Voting–and Community

“I met those of our society who had votes in the ensuing election, and advised them, 1. To vote, without fee or reward, for the person they judged most worthy: 2. To speak no evil of the person they voted against: And, 3. To take care their spirits were not sharpened against those that voted on the other side.”                             –John Wesley, October  6, 1774

Some of my United Methodist colleagues have recently rediscovered Wesley’s election-year advice. If they haven’t already, I hope they will soon build a Sunday message around these words. But my unscientific assessment suggests that will happen rarely if at all. “Be sure to vote” is all the political speech many pastors dare in public. Besides, worship calendars in November are already overcrowded with stewardship season, Veterans Day on Sunday this year, Thanksgiving, then a week to breathe before Advent begins. We’re busy, busy, busy. Besides, “voting” isn’t in the lectionary.

Nevertheless, I believe Wesley’s words contain a word from the Lord that needs to be heard–more than echoes of “busy, busy, busy”. So I urge some of my active colleagues to reprioritize beyond “worship as usual”. Yes, sisters and brothers, I hear you: “Easy for you to say from the safety of retirement.” Yes, and even easier since I’ll be out of the country when the election happens. But this word needs to be heard. On Nov. 7, winners and losers will have to figure out how to live together for four more years. Folks with diverse political views will still have to worship and work together. Wesley’s wisdom provides an alternative to the prevailing polarization and winner-take-all attitude.

If I were preaching, I’d ground the message biblically in Romans 13-15. Paul points out that “Love does no wrong to a neighbor…love is the fulfilling of the law.” (13:8-10) In ch. 14 he calls for tolerance among folks with very different strongly held views. “Why do you pass judgment on your neighbor?” (14:10) Being right matters less than making sure we do not cause our neighbor to stumble (14:13). Paul moves on to remind us that building up our neighbor matters more than pleasing ourselves (15:1-2) and challenges everyone to “Welcome one another…just as Christ has welcomed you…” (15:7)

I’d address Wesley’s three points (not my typical preaching MO) from that perspective:1. To vote, without fee or reward, for the person they judged most worthy:” I identify the “fee or reward” that tempts us today as narrow self-interest. Today’s political propaganda addresses one very basic question: “What’s in it for me?” Rarely do we ask “What’s best for our society as a whole?” “The common good” isn’t commonly considered in our political discourse. Rarely does a candidate or elected politician dare call for sacrifice to help the neediest among us, or to achieve a worthy common goal, e.g. deficit reduction. Jesus urged us to put others’ needs before our own. “The person judged most worthy” sounds to me like the one who would best serve the common good. What if from now on we refuse to settle for endless political pandering to narrow self-interest? What if we demanded that candidates address their vision of “the common good” and how to achieve it?

  “2. To speak no evil of the person they voted against:” Earlier Paul wrote, “…There is no one who is righteous, not even one;” (Rom. 3:10). What fun is election season if we can’t bash the other side—especially when they’re so wrong/incompetent/buffoonish/crooked/fill in your own word. Besides, the worse the opponent is, the better my candidate looks. But every poisonous, polarizing half-truth and stereotype we repeat poisons our spirits as well. The other side loses their humanity in our eyes and becomes “them”. Every time we dehumanize another person, we dehumanize ourselves as well. “Why do you pass judgment on your neighbor?” Let us who follow Jesus practice more civil political speech. We can debate policies and positions without demeaning persons. Cosistent Christ-like behavior in this respect is a powerful witness. Our neighbors might find such credible Christianity attractive or at least intriguing.

“And, 3. To take care their spirits were not sharpened against those that voted on the other side.” It’s hard to get close to someone with a “sharpened” spirit. The razor edges hold us at bay. Most of us won’t risk trying to move closer. Instead, we tend to “sharpen” in response. We claim our position even more strongly whether our candidate won or lost. “Sharpening our spirits” sinks us deeper and deeper into self-defensive self-righteousness. We confirm the other’s ideological [and personal/spiritual] wrongness as we confirm our own (self-) righteousness. Our differences don’t magically dissolve following an election.In fact, lately we seem to take a brief break and then resume hammering each other even harder as if nothing had been decided.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Let’s listen closely to Wesley soon after this intense and often bitter election campaign. Let’s also listen closely to Paul: “Welcome one another…just as Christ has welcomed you.”  We could probably use a preacher to lovingly and firmly challenge us in the spirit of Joshua: “Choose this day who you will be.”

As I said earlier, it won’t be me. I’ll be out of the country. I have no invitations to preach after we return. Brother/sister preacher, will you be the one who shares this word? My stuff isn’t copyrighted. I would like to know how you use it and what response you get. Laypersons, will you be the one who encourages your pastor to speak this word we all need to hear? Maybe you can do it together. It doesn’t matter so much who’s in the spotlight. It matters hugely that the word is heard—and embraced—and lived.


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